reactnative

Android Data Binding Libraries

Most applications typically work with data. Until recently, Android developers had to write a lot of code because of no first-class platform support for data binding. Developers need to get the data for a database or user input and then assign values to the elements that present it to the user in the UI. This made Android data binding a pretty laborious, non-intellectual exercise for developers. In Google IO 2015, a new data binding library was demonstrated; it removes the need to write such code. This library helps change the data binding development into the following three steps: Create a binding from a layout Retrieve the data Bind the data to the view This reduction in code authoring is powered by code that is generated by the data binding library that analyzes the layout file. The Gradle plugin then creates a binding class file and then creates binding methods in…

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reactnative

Introduction to Meteor and what you’ll Need to know.

Meteor.js is an open-source platform built on Node and MongoDB. It’s not just a framework, it’s more than that. Meteor is more of a platform than Angular. It is both server and client-side code and handles a lot of the parts of applications that we need to create manually in Angular. You don’t need much “stuff” to develop with Meteor. With Meteor, there’s only three things you’ll need: You’ll need a major operating systems. You can use Meteor on any relatively modern version of Mac OS X, Windows, or Linux. You’ll need a text editor. Here, there’s no precise requirements. If you want to write code in Notepad, you can. Recommend sublime – a cross-platform editor with plenty of neat plugins and productivity features. You’ll need a modern web browser. This is what we’ll use to preview our Meteor application. Recommended would be using the latest version of Google Chrome…

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