Android, IOS, Testing

Android and iOS UI Testing with Calabash

Testing is an essential part of any mobile app development process. Whether you are automating such tests or not, no sane developer considers their work to be done unless they have tested their app. A well-tested app usually goes through multiple steps of testing: Unit testing, integration testing, acceptance testing, and so on. As your app grows, the importance of testing increases and automation in testing becomes a necessity. While other platforms, such as the web, have advanced significantly in terms of testing mechanisms and frameworks, the mobile realm is not lagging behind. In this article, you will learn how you can use Calabash to automate the UI for your Android and iOS apps using plain English instructions and make acceptance testing them as painless as possible. What Is UI Testing All About? If you have been testing your apps manually, you are probably wasting a big chunk of your…

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reactnative

A Truce in the HTML CSS vs. Native War Linkites

Mutiple exposure shot of developers working late superimposed on a urban skyline at night

For many years, mobile app developers have had to make a uniquely difficult choice: Do I develop my apps using the native tools from Apple or Google, or do I build my app using some sort of cross-platform solution? It’s widely accepted that native tools are needed for developers to create the best user experience. They produce faster, neater apps that look and behave the way users expect for each platform.The downside is that those tools are quite hard to learn and time-consuming to use, especially compared to tools used to build web sites. Native tools are also based on completely incompatible programming languages, meaning an app needs to be developed twice or more to run on iOS, Android and other platforms. This is an obvious cost-driver and major pain for the entire industry. Cross-platform solutions, on the other hand, have mostly been based on web technologies such as HTML,…

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reactnative

Android Data Binding Libraries

Most applications typically work with data. Until recently, Android developers had to write a lot of code because of no first-class platform support for data binding. Developers need to get the data for a database or user input and then assign values to the elements that present it to the user in the UI. This made Android data binding a pretty laborious, non-intellectual exercise for developers. In Google IO 2015, a new data binding library was demonstrated; it removes the need to write such code. This library helps change the data binding development into the following three steps: Create a binding from a layout Retrieve the data Bind the data to the view This reduction in code authoring is powered by code that is generated by the data binding library that analyzes the layout file. The Gradle plugin then creates a binding class file and then creates binding methods in…

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